Skywatchers enjoyed ‘supermoon eclipse’

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Mike Clary got this picture of the partially eclipsed moon as it rose above the mountains east of Canyon Lake.

Mike Clary got this picture of the partially eclipsed moon as it rose above the mountains east of Canyon Lake.

Area residents were treated to a clear view of Sunday’s supermoon eclipse last Sunday, September 27; though by the time the moon rose above the mountains, the eclipse had already begun.

It was the first “supermoon total lunar eclipse” in more than 30 years. It was considered a supermoon because the moon was at its closes point to earth during the time of the eclipse. It also was called a “blood moon” because of its deep red color while seen in earth’s shadow.

According to space.com three separate lunar events occurred. On the calendar, the full moon was nearest the fall equinox, giving it the name “harvest moon.” The moon was at its closest approach to earth for the year, giving it the name “supermoon.”. And the earth got directly between the sun and the moon, which cast the moon in complete shadow, known as a full eclipse.

According to NASA, the last time this triple combination occurred was in 1982, and it won’t repeat until 2033. This celestial event was the last in a series of four lunar eclipses, dubbed a tetrad, over the last two years, which gave many end times prognasticators something to talk about.

The Friday Flyer thanks all the photographers who provided photos of this event. They included Bert Barbay, Sandra Bos, Mike Clary, Sarah Dowler, David Molner and Pat Van Dyke.

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Sharon Rice